Species Details

Caenurgina annexa

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum Read more about this collection »

Common NameBanded Grass-moth SeasonalityAdults fly in Alberta in late May and June. IdentificationA medium-size (2.8-3.0 cm wingspan) broad-winged moth. The forewings of the male are blue-grey, with contrasting black antemedian and postmedian bands, the former bleeding outward into the median area along its upper half. The terminal band and fringe are dark grey. The hind wings are pale buff-orange, with prominent and slightly sinuous dull black post median, sub terminal and terminal bands and a pale fringe. There is a dark discal spot, and dark scaling running from the basal area to the post median band. Sexes similar, but females are browner and less sharply marked. Most likely to be mistaken for a Drasteria (petricola or hudsonica), but annexa has three narrow bands crossing the hindwing, whereas Drasteria have two wider and more sinuous ones. Other Alberta Caenurgina (erechtea and crassiuscula) are larger, paler in color or have less contrasting patterns. The ventral surface in particular is prominently banded in annexa and unmarked or at best faintly banded in the others.

Scientific Name Caenurgina annexa Common Name Banded Grass-moth Seasonality Adults fly in Alberta in late May and June. Identification
A medium-size (2.8-3.0 cm wingspan) broad-winged moth. The forewings of the male are blue-grey, with contrasting black antemedian and postmedian bands, the former bleeding outward into the median area along its upper…
A medium-size (2.8-3.0 cm wingspan) broad-winged moth. The forewings of the male are blue-grey, with contrasting black antemedian and postmedian bands, the former bleeding outward into the median area along its upper half. The terminal band and fringe are dark grey. The hind wings are pale buff-orange, with prominent and slightly sinuous dull black post median, sub terminal and terminal bands and a pale fringe. There is a dark discal spot, and dark scaling running from the basal area to the post median band. Sexes similar, but females are browner and less sharply marked. Most likely to be mistaken for a Drasteria (petricola or hudsonica), but annexa has three narrow bands crossing the hindwing, whereas Drasteria have two wider and more sinuous ones. Other Alberta Caenurgina (erechtea and crassiuscula) are larger, paler in color or have less contrasting patterns. The ventral surface in particular is prominently banded in annexa and unmarked or at best faintly banded in the others.
Life History Adults fly during the day, and possibly also at night, as do the other members of the genus. There appears to be a single brood in Alberta, with adults flying in the spring. Conservation Uncommon but widespread and in relatively secure habitats. Diet Info No information available. Range Western Alberta and Montana west to BC, Washington and Oregon. In Alberta it has been collected in the foothills and mountains from Nordegg south, east to the Drumheller area and Lethbridge.

Taxonomic Hierarchy

Kingdom Animalia Phylum Arthropoda Class Hexapoda Subclass Insecta Order Lepidoptera Suborder Ditrysia Superfamily Noctuoidea Family Noctuidae Subfamily Catocalinae Genus Caenurgina Species Caenurgina annexa
This hierarchy is created from our museum records, it may not always accurately reflect modern taxonomies.

Taxonomic Hierarchy for University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum