Species Details

Conochares arizonae

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum Read more about this collection »

Common NameArizona Bird-dropping Moth IdentificationA small (1.8-2.1 cm wingspan) bright white and dark brown moth. The forewings are sharply divided into an immaculate white basal half and an outer half of mixed light and dark brown and tan. The reniform is a prominent round dark spot, ringed with paler scales. The upper third of the fringe is dark, the remainder white. The hindwings are uniform sooty brown with white fringes. The antennae are filiform, and the sexes are similar. Unlike any other Alberta moth in pattern and color except Tarachidia binocula, which has some yellow-orange on the forewing and even-colored fringes on the forewings.

Scientific Name Conochares arizonae Common Name Arizona Bird-dropping Moth Identification
A small (1.8-2.1 cm wingspan) bright white and dark brown moth. The forewings are sharply divided into an immaculate white basal half and an outer half of mixed light and dark brown and tan. The reniform is a…
A small (1.8-2.1 cm wingspan) bright white and dark brown moth. The forewings are sharply divided into an immaculate white basal half and an outer half of mixed light and dark brown and tan. The reniform is a prominent round dark spot, ringed with paler scales. The upper third of the fringe is dark, the remainder white. The hindwings are uniform sooty brown with white fringes. The antennae are filiform, and the sexes are similar. Unlike any other Alberta moth in pattern and color except Tarachidia binocula, which has some yellow-orange on the forewing and even-colored fringes on the forewings.
Life History
The adults are nocturnal and come to light, and there is a single annual brood. The larvae and larval hosts are apparently unknown. Unlike many moths in the subfamily Acontiinae, the black and white adults are…
The adults are nocturnal and come to light, and there is a single annual brood. The larvae and larval hosts are apparently unknown. Unlike many moths in the subfamily Acontiinae, the black and white adults are believed to be bird-dropping mimics.
Conservation A widespread species, rather uncommon and local at the northern edge of their range in Alberta. Diet Info No information available. Range
Southern Saskatchewan, Alberta and British Columbia, south to Arizona and California. In Alberta collected only in the dry valleys in the eastern part of the province, north in the Red Deer River valley to the…
Southern Saskatchewan, Alberta and British Columbia, south to Arizona and California. In Alberta collected only in the dry valleys in the eastern part of the province, north in the Red Deer River valley to the northern end of Dry Island Provincial Park.

Citation

Page Citation for Conochares arizonae

Page Citation

"Conochares arizonae, University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum." University of Alberta Museums Search Site, https://search.museums.ualberta.ca/g/2-3689. Accessed 20 Jun. 2021.

Taxonomic Hierarchy

Kingdom Animalia Phylum Arthropoda Class Hexapoda Subclass Insecta Order Lepidoptera Suborder Ditrysia Superfamily Noctuoidea Family Noctuidae Subfamily Acontiinae Genus Conochares Species Conochares arizonae
This hierarchy is created from our museum records, it may not always accurately reflect modern taxonomies.

Taxonomic Hierarchy for University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum