Species Details

Gluphisia severa

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum Read more about this collection »

Common NameBanded Pebble SeasonalityOne of the first moths to emerge in the spring, from early May - mid July, depending on elevation. IdentificationA fairly large (3.5 - 4.5 cm. wingspan) broad-winged moth. The forewing is grey, crossed with diffuse lines of black and yellow-brown. The hindwing is light grey with two faint darker bands, which become black and prominent in the anal angle. The largest and darkest of the four species of Gluphisia. G. severa is similar to G. lintneri, which it meets and flies with in the foothills. Severa is larger, somewhat darker, and lacks the large, diffuse but prominent dark patch along the inner half of the lower edge of the forewing. This is replaced in severa by a short, dark bar or spot at the bottom of the antemedian line. Questionable specimens may require dissection for positive identification. In severa males, the lobes of the uncus are narrow, subacute and deeply excavated; the lobes of the transtilla are broad, short and acute; and the juxta is broad, widely excavated, and has acute, produced lobes. Females are a bit larger, darker and more strongly banded than males. Male severa also bear a close resemblance to the Geometrid moth Lycia ursaria, which flies at the same time. L. ursaria is grey and lacks the prominent yellow-browns of severa.

Scientific Name Gluphisia severa Common Name Banded Pebble Habitat Mixedwood and deciduous forest in the mountains and along the western edge of the foothills. Seasonality One of the first moths to emerge in the spring, from early May - mid July, depending on elevation. Identification
A fairly large (3.5 - 4.5 cm. wingspan) broad-winged moth. The forewing is grey, crossed with diffuse lines of black and yellow-brown. The hindwing is light grey with two faint darker bands, which become black and…
A fairly large (3.5 - 4.5 cm. wingspan) broad-winged moth. The forewing is grey, crossed with diffuse lines of black and yellow-brown. The hindwing is light grey with two faint darker bands, which become black and prominent in the anal angle. The largest and darkest of the four species of Gluphisia. G. severa is similar to G. lintneri, which it meets and flies with in the foothills. Severa is larger, somewhat darker, and lacks the large, diffuse but prominent dark patch along the inner half of the lower edge of the forewing. This is replaced in severa by a short, dark bar or spot at the bottom of the antemedian line. Questionable specimens may require dissection for positive identification. In severa males, the lobes of the uncus are narrow, subacute and deeply excavated; the lobes of the transtilla are broad, short and acute; and the juxta is broad, widely excavated, and has acute, produced lobes. Females are a bit larger, darker and more strongly banded than males. Male severa also bear a close resemblance to the Geometrid moth Lycia ursaria, which flies at the same time. L. ursaria is grey and lacks the prominent yellow-browns of severa.
Life History The Banded Pebble is one of the first moths to emerge in the spring. Adults are nocturnal and come readily to light. The larvae are apparently solitary defoliators. They overwinter in the pupal stage. Conservation A common, widespread species. No concerns. Diet Info No Alberta data available. In BC, larvae have been found on White birch (Betula papyrifera), cherry (Prunus), willow (Salix), and Trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides). (Prentice et al, 1962). Range
A western mountain species, occurring from Vancouver Island east to the Alberta foothills. In Alberta, it occurs throughout the mountains, east to about Beavermines, Seebe, Nordegg and Pocahontas. The only area where…
A western mountain species, occurring from Vancouver Island east to the Alberta foothills. In Alberta, it occurs throughout the mountains, east to about Beavermines, Seebe, Nordegg and Pocahontas. The only area where it has been collected east of the mountains is in the northern Peace River area, near Dixonville, where it was taken in the same trap with Gluphisia lintneri.

Citation

Page Citation for Gluphisia severa

Page Citation

"Gluphisia severa, University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum." University of Alberta Museums Search Site, https://search.museums.ualberta.ca/g/2-361. Accessed 19 Sep. 2021.

Taxonomic Hierarchy

Kingdom Animalia Phylum Arthropoda Class Hexapoda Subclass Insecta Order Lepidoptera Suborder Ditrysia Superfamily Noctuoidea Family Notodontidae Genus Gluphisia Species Gluphisia severa
This hierarchy is created from our museum records, it may not always accurately reflect modern taxonomies.

Taxonomic Hierarchy for University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum