Species Details

Coccinella novemnotata

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum Read more about this collection »

Common NameNine-spot Ladybug (or Nine-spotted Ladybug) SeasonalityIt has two generations in one summer. But unlike C. septempunctata there are no indications of overlap. The spring generation goes into diapause due to the increasing day length in summer and the summer generation goes into diapause due to decreasing day length in fall (Acorn, 2007). Identification4.0-7.0 mm long. A pale orange, rounded ladybug with nine black spots on the wing cover. Narrow black pigment where the wing cover meets, a feature that helps distinguish it from seven-spot ladybug (Acorn, 2007; Belicek, 1976). It also has spotless forms that can be confused with other spotless ladybugs. In that situation it is best to use the colouration and patterns on the head. It exhibits no sexual dimorphism (ADW, 2012).

Scientific Name Coccinella novemnotata Common Name Nine-spot Ladybug (or Nine-spotted Ladybug) Seasonality
It has two generations in one summer. But unlike C. septempunctata there are no indications of overlap. The spring generation goes into diapause due to the increasing day length in summer and the summer generation…
It has two generations in one summer. But unlike C. septempunctata there are no indications of overlap. The spring generation goes into diapause due to the increasing day length in summer and the summer generation goes into diapause due to decreasing day length in fall (Acorn, 2007).
Identification
4.0-7.0 mm long. A pale orange, rounded ladybug with nine black spots on the wing cover. Narrow black pigment where the wing cover meets, a feature that helps distinguish it from seven-spot ladybug (Acorn, 2007; Belicek,…
4.0-7.0 mm long. A pale orange, rounded ladybug with nine black spots on the wing cover. Narrow black pigment where the wing cover meets, a feature that helps distinguish it from seven-spot ladybug (Acorn, 2007; Belicek, 1976). It also has spotless forms that can be confused with other spotless ladybugs. In that situation it is best to use the colouration and patterns on the head. It exhibits no sexual dimorphism (ADW, 2012).
Life History
Larvae hatch from an egg after approximately 4 days. Larvae has four instars, the first takes 22.6%, second takes 15.9%, third takes 18.5% and the fourth takes 42.9% of the total developmental time (Hodek & Honek,…
Larvae hatch from an egg after approximately 4 days. Larvae has four instars, the first takes 22.6%, second takes 15.9%, third takes 18.5% and the fourth takes 42.9% of the total developmental time (Hodek & Honek, 1996). It takes the larvae four-five days to reach the third instar, after approximately seven more days it reaches the end of fourth instar. Just like C. septempunctata larvae stop feeding 24 hours before pupating. It spends four days pupating and then emerges as an adult and spends one full day strengthening and pigmenting its elytra. Not much is known about the mating habits of C.novemnotata, but they are speculated to be similar to those of C. septempunctata. It is known though that the adult takes two to four days to become sexually mature. Adults breed continuously for most of the summer until just before diapause (ADW, 2012).
Conservation Not evaluated. Due to a massive decline in population throughout North America, it may be nominated of future conservation efforts (ADW, 2012). Diet Info Larvae in a lab experiment ate nymphal leafhoppers (Hodek & Honek, 1996). Adults are insectivore and have a wide diet of crop pests such as aphids, scale insects, mites, weevils and lepidopteron eggs (EOL, n.d.; ADW, 2012). Range
At one time it had a wide range all over North America, including Mexico and Guatemala (its native habitat) (Crotch, 1874). But it was considered extirpate from much of eastern United States and Canada, until it was…
At one time it had a wide range all over North America, including Mexico and Guatemala (its native habitat) (Crotch, 1874). But it was considered extirpate from much of eastern United States and Canada, until it was discovered in New York in 2011 (EOL, n.d.). It has continued survival in Alberta and Saskatchewan (Acorn, 2007).
Coccinella novemnotata
Coccinella novemnotata

Citation

Page Citation for Coccinella novemnotata

Page Citation

"Coccinella novemnotata, University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum." University of Alberta Museums Search Site, https://search.museums.ualberta.ca/g/2-31338. Accessed 12 May. 2021.

Taxonomic Hierarchy

Kingdom Animalia Phylum Arthropoda Class Hexapoda Subclass Insecta Order Coleoptera Suborder Polyphaga Family Coccinellidae Subfamily Coccinellinae Tribe Coccinellini Genus Coccinella Species Coccinella novemnotata
This hierarchy is created from our museum records, it may not always accurately reflect modern taxonomies.

Taxonomic Hierarchy for University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum