Species Details

Drasteria petricola

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum Read more about this collection »

Common NameLittle Arches SeasonalityAdult flight peaks between mid May and mid July, earlier at lower elevations. IdentificationThe smallest of the Arches (Drasteria) moths. In Alberta, it is the only species in the genus with black lines along the veins of the ventral forewing margin. The mountain populations (ssp. athabasca) tend to be slightly larger and have a more yellow-tan cast to the hindwing compared to the prairie populations (ssp. crokeri). Prairie individuals can be strikingly different with their blue-grey and white colouration, and Barnes and Benjamin (1924) thought these differences may be indicative of a separate species; Individuals from the Calgary and Lethbridge region seem to be intermediate between the two forms, but more work is needed to clarify this situation.

Scientific Name Drasteria petricola Common Name Little Arches Habitat Sparsely vegetated, open habitats, including alpine and montane meadows and prairie grasslands. Seasonality Adult flight peaks between mid May and mid July, earlier at lower elevations. Identification
The smallest of the Arches (Drasteria) moths. In Alberta, it is the only species in the genus with black lines along the veins of the ventral forewing margin. The mountain populations (ssp. athabasca) tend to be…
The smallest of the Arches (Drasteria) moths. In Alberta, it is the only species in the genus with black lines along the veins of the ventral forewing margin. The mountain populations (ssp. athabasca) tend to be slightly larger and have a more yellow-tan cast to the hindwing compared to the prairie populations (ssp. crokeri). Prairie individuals can be strikingly different with their blue-grey and white colouration, and Barnes and Benjamin (1924) thought these differences may be indicative of a separate species; Individuals from the Calgary and Lethbridge region seem to be intermediate between the two forms, but more work is needed to clarify this situation.
Life History Adults are diurnal and do not come to light. They can be difficult to detect and observe with their rapid flight and contrasting black and white coloration. Conservation Not of concern. Diet Info The larvae feed on Hedysarum (Lafontaine & Wood 1997). Adults take nectar at flowers, including mint in Utah (Richards 1939). Range A western species, found from the Yukon and NWT south to New Mexico in the Rockies, east to Manitoba (Lafontaine & Wood 1997).

Citation

Page Citation for Drasteria petricola

Page Citation

"Drasteria petricola, University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum." University of Alberta Museums Search Site, https://search.museums.ualberta.ca/g/2-2915. Accessed 21 May. 2022.

Taxonomic Hierarchy

Kingdom Animalia Phylum Arthropoda Class Hexapoda Subclass Insecta Order Lepidoptera Suborder Ditrysia Superfamily Noctuoidea Family Noctuidae Subfamily Catocalinae Genus Drasteria Species Drasteria petricola
This hierarchy is created from our museum records, it may not always accurately reflect modern taxonomies.

Taxonomic Hierarchy for University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum