Species Details

Schinia cumatilis

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum Read more about this collection »

Common NameSilver-banded Gem SeasonalityIn Alberta adults fly from mid July through mid August. IdentificationA small (2.4-2.7 cm. wingspan) shining white moth with olive and grey markings. The forewing has a thick, bent antemedial line, a wide subterminal line which bends outward to the anal angle, and a wide terminal band which breaks down into a series of large spots near the bottom. The reniform is an indistinct dark patch showing through from the underside. The hindwing has a large dark discal mark and a narrow terminal band. The fringes are white except for a short space near the forewing apex, which when viewed against a light background gives the illusion that the wing is acutely pointed. The sexes are similar.

Scientific Name Schinia cumatilis Common Name Silver-banded Gem Habitat Dry native grassland; native pasture. Seasonality In Alberta adults fly from mid July through mid August. Identification
A small (2.4-2.7 cm. wingspan) shining white moth with olive and grey markings. The forewing has a thick, bent antemedial line, a wide subterminal line which bends outward to the anal angle, and a wide terminal band…
A small (2.4-2.7 cm. wingspan) shining white moth with olive and grey markings. The forewing has a thick, bent antemedial line, a wide subterminal line which bends outward to the anal angle, and a wide terminal band which breaks down into a series of large spots near the bottom. The reniform is an indistinct dark patch showing through from the underside. The hindwing has a large dark discal mark and a narrow terminal band. The fringes are white except for a short space near the forewing apex, which when viewed against a light background gives the illusion that the wing is acutely pointed. The sexes are similar.
Life History The Silver-banded Gem is nocturnal and comes to light. The life history is apparently poorly known, and the immature stages remain undescribed. Conservation A fairly common, widespread species; no concerns. Diet Info
"A few years ago, in Alberta, I observed a female of cumatilis ovipositing in the blossoms of the Prairie Wool, Artemesia frigida Willdenow." (Hardwick, 1996). All members of the genus Schinia feed on the flowering…
"A few years ago, in Alberta, I observed a female of cumatilis ovipositing in the blossoms of the Prairie Wool, Artemesia frigida Willdenow." (Hardwick, 1996). All members of the genus Schinia feed on the flowering parts and developing seeds of their respective hosts. They tend to be very host specific, feeding on a single species or a very few closely related genera.
Range Southern Saskatchewan, Alberta and BC, south to Arizona and New Mexico. Silver-banded Gems are widespread in southern Alberta, north to Edmonton and Nordegg, and have recently been discovered in the Peace River district.

Citation

Page Citation for Schinia cumatilis

Page Citation

"Species Details - Schinia cumatilis, University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum." University of Alberta Museums Search Site, https://search.museums.ualberta.ca/g/2-280. Accessed 29 Jun. 2022.

Taxonomic Hierarchy

Kingdom Animalia Phylum Arthropoda Class Hexapoda Subclass Insecta Order Lepidoptera Suborder Ditrysia Superfamily Noctuoidea Family Noctuidae Subfamily Heliothentinae Genus Schinia Species Schinia cumatilis
This hierarchy is created from our museum records, it may not always accurately reflect modern taxonomies.

Taxonomic Hierarchy for University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum