Species Details

Nycteola cinereana

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum Read more about this collection »

Common NameGrey Midget SeasonalityIn Alberta, adults have been collected from late August to mid October. IdentificationA small (2.5-3.1 cm wingspan) "square-winged" light grey moth with shiny white hindwings. The adults come in several form, the most common with the forewings marked with a large dark triangular patch in the upper median area, and an oblique black streak along the wing base. The antemedian and postmedian lines are doubled and sinuous, and the round reniform spot has a rust-red pupil. There is also a thin black terminal line. Some specimens lack the dark patches and are quite uniform in color. The hindwings are shiny white, darkening slightly toward the margin. The antennae are simple and the sexes are similar. The similar N. frigidana is darker grey and lacks the dark edging or basal streaks along the wing base, and often have an egg shaped white or silvery patch near the upper forewing base. There are also a number of similar appearing Tortricid moths.

Scientific Name Nycteola cinereana Common Name Grey Midget Habitat Deciduous (poplar) woodland. Seasonality In Alberta, adults have been collected from late August to mid October. Identification
A small (2.5-3.1 cm wingspan) "square-winged" light grey moth with shiny white hindwings. The adults come in several form, the most common with the forewings marked with a large dark triangular patch in the upper…
A small (2.5-3.1 cm wingspan) "square-winged" light grey moth with shiny white hindwings. The adults come in several form, the most common with the forewings marked with a large dark triangular patch in the upper median area, and an oblique black streak along the wing base. The antemedian and postmedian lines are doubled and sinuous, and the round reniform spot has a rust-red pupil. There is also a thin black terminal line. Some specimens lack the dark patches and are quite uniform in color. The hindwings are shiny white, darkening slightly toward the margin. The antennae are simple and the sexes are similar. The similar N. frigidana is darker grey and lacks the dark edging or basal streaks along the wing base, and often have an egg shaped white or silvery patch near the upper forewing base. There are also a number of similar appearing Tortricid moths.
Life History
According to Prentice (1962) the larvae feed as colonial tent makers when common, but are also frequently found as single defoliators. The late fall-early spring flight period may indicate that adults overwinter.…
According to Prentice (1962) the larvae feed as colonial tent makers when common, but are also frequently found as single defoliators. The late fall-early spring flight period may indicate that adults overwinter. Adults are occasionally collected in light traps, but they are apparently not strongly attracted to lights and may be much more common than trapping would indicate.
Conservation A widespread species; no concerns. Diet Info Poplars, and in particular Balsam Poplar (Populus balsamifera). Range Newfoundland west across Canada to southern BC. In Alberta the Grey Midget has been collected in the Boreal forest and parkland regions, north to Zama and south to Edmonton and Didsbury.

Citation

Page Citation for Nycteola cinereana

Page Citation

"Nycteola cinereana, University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum." University of Alberta Museums Search Site, https://search.museums.ualberta.ca/g/2-2776. Accessed 08 Dec. 2021.

Taxonomic Hierarchy

Kingdom Animalia Phylum Arthropoda Class Hexapoda Subclass Insecta Order Lepidoptera Suborder Ditrysia Superfamily Noctuoidea Family Noctuidae Subfamily Sarrothripinae Tribe Sarrothripini Genus Nycteola Species Nycteola cinereana
This hierarchy is created from our museum records, it may not always accurately reflect modern taxonomies.

Taxonomic Hierarchy for University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum