Species Details

Ceranemota albertae

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum Read more about this collection »

Common NameAlberta Lutestring SeasonalityIn Alberta adults have been collected from mid-August through mid-September. IdentificationMedium-size (3.2-3.9 cm wingspan) moths with smooth slate-grey forewings and dirty white or pale grey hindwings. The forewings are crossed by sinuous, doubled antemedian and postmedian lines, which are infilled with pale rusty-orange scales. There is a short black line looping inward from the apex, a thin black terminal line broken at the veins, and a small raised tuft of dark grey scales near the wing base and at the orbicular. The hindwings are crossed by a faint median band, and have a narrow black terminal line. The antennae are dentate; the sexes are similar. This interesting and uncommon moth is a member of a small genus restricted to western North America. The Alberta Lutestring, the only member of the genus found in Alberta, was originally described in 1938 from three specimens collected by Dod at the head of Pine Creek, just west of Calgary.

Scientific Name Ceranemota albertae Common Name Alberta Lutestring Habitat Dry open woodland and shrub areas with wild cherry. Seasonality In Alberta adults have been collected from mid-August through mid-September. Identification
Medium-size (3.2-3.9 cm wingspan) moths with smooth slate-grey forewings and dirty white or pale grey hindwings. The forewings are crossed by sinuous, doubled antemedian and postmedian lines, which are infilled with…
Medium-size (3.2-3.9 cm wingspan) moths with smooth slate-grey forewings and dirty white or pale grey hindwings. The forewings are crossed by sinuous, doubled antemedian and postmedian lines, which are infilled with pale rusty-orange scales. There is a short black line looping inward from the apex, a thin black terminal line broken at the veins, and a small raised tuft of dark grey scales near the wing base and at the orbicular. The hindwings are crossed by a faint median band, and have a narrow black terminal line. The antennae are dentate; the sexes are similar. This interesting and uncommon moth is a member of a small genus restricted to western North America. The Alberta Lutestring, the only member of the genus found in Alberta, was originally described in 1938 from three specimens collected by Dod at the head of Pine Creek, just west of Calgary.
Life History The adults fly in late summer and early fall, and are attracted to both light and sugar baits. Conservation Uncommon and local, but no obvious concerns. Diet Info Unknown. Larvae of related species of Ceranemota utilize wild cherries and Saskatoon (Amelancier), and chokecherry (Prunus virginiana) is a suspected host of albertae in Alberta. Range
Known only from western Canada, where it occurs from south-central British Columbia east to southeastern Saskatchewan. In Alberta occurs in wooded river valleys in the arid shortgrass prairie and open sandy pine…
Known only from western Canada, where it occurs from south-central British Columbia east to southeastern Saskatchewan. In Alberta occurs in wooded river valleys in the arid shortgrass prairie and open sandy pine barrens in the southern Boreal forest. It has been collected from Writing-on-Stone in the arid short-grass prairie region north into the southern Boreal forest near Ft. Assiniboine and Redwater.

Citation

Page Citation for Ceranemota albertae

Page Citation

"Ceranemota albertae, University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum." University of Alberta Museums Search Site, https://search.museums.ualberta.ca/g/2-2773. Accessed 29 Nov. 2021.

Taxonomic Hierarchy

Kingdom Animalia Phylum Arthropoda Class Hexapoda Subclass Insecta Order Lepidoptera Suborder Ditrysia Superfamily Drepanoidea Family Thyatiridae Subfamily Polyplocinae Tribe Ceranemotini Genus Ceranemota Species Ceranemota albertae
This hierarchy is created from our museum records, it may not always accurately reflect modern taxonomies.

Taxonomic Hierarchy for University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum