Species Details

Hyalophora gloveri

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum Read more about this collection »

Common NameGlover's Silkmoth SeasonalityAdults are active from mid May to late June, with most records from the 2nd and 3rd week of June. IdentificationIn Alberta, this species is similar only to H. cecropia, from which it differs in being primarily a maroon colour, rather than black. H. cecropia also has a bright red band along the outer margin of the transverse white band, which is absent in H. gloveri. Royal Alberta Museum page

Scientific Name Hyalophora gloveri Common Name Glover's Silkmoth Habitat Found in shrubby areas of the prairies and open jack pine forests in the boreal region. Seasonality Adults are active from mid May to late June, with most records from the 2nd and 3rd week of June. Identification
In Alberta, this species is similar only to H. cecropia, from which it differs in being primarily a maroon colour, rather than black. H. cecropia also has a bright red band along the outer margin of the transverse…
In Alberta, this species is similar only to H. cecropia, from which it differs in being primarily a maroon colour, rather than black. H. cecropia also has a bright red band along the outer margin of the transverse white band, which is absent in H. gloveri. Royal Alberta Museum page
Life History
The overwintering cocoons of Glover's Silkmoth can sometimes be found attached to the stems of shrubs and small trees, usually on or near the larval host plant. Adult moths are attracted to light, but are generally…
The overwintering cocoons of Glover's Silkmoth can sometimes be found attached to the stems of shrubs and small trees, usually on or near the larval host plant. Adult moths are attracted to light, but are generally not active until midnight or later. These moths are active on nights when ambient air temperature often drops below 5°C, which few other species tolerate.
Conservation No conservation concerns, although rarely common, this species is widespread throughout the province Diet Info
Preferred larval hostplants in AB include Silverberry (Elaeagnus commutata), Choke Cherry (Prunus virginiana) and willow (Salix spp.). Host plant choice depends on availability and habitat; in the boreal forest,…
Preferred larval hostplants in AB include Silverberry (Elaeagnus commutata), Choke Cherry (Prunus virginiana) and willow (Salix spp.). Host plant choice depends on availability and habitat; in the boreal forest, larvae are found on Choke Cherry (D. Macaulay, pers. comm.). H. columbia columbia of eastern Canada feeds only on larch (Larix laricina), but H. gloveri rarely if ever uses this plant in nature. However, larvae do well on larch in captivity.
Range Hay River, N.W.T., south to Arizona, east to southwestern Manitoba.
Photo Courtesy of Gary Anweiler
Photo Courtesy of Gary Anweiler
Photo Courtesy of Gary Anweiler

Citation

Page Citation for Hyalophora gloveri

Page Citation

"Species Details - Hyalophora gloveri, University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum." University of Alberta Museums Search Site, https://search.museums.ualberta.ca/g/2-267. Accessed 13 Aug. 2022.

Taxonomic Hierarchy

Kingdom Animalia Phylum Arthropoda Class Hexapoda Subclass Insecta Order Lepidoptera Suborder Ditrysia Superfamily Bombycoidea Family Saturniidae Genus Hyalophora Species Hyalophora gloveri
This hierarchy is created from our museum records, it may not always accurately reflect modern taxonomies.

Taxonomic Hierarchy for University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum