Species Details

Polygonia faunus

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum Read more about this collection »

Common NameGreen Comma SeasonalityOne brood per year, appearing in early spring (April to May) and again in August to October. IdentificationThe predominantly grey underside is most like that of P. progne, P. oreas and P. gracilis; the Green Comma has a more mottled rather than a two-toned underside, and the moss-green patches in the margins of the underside will serve to distinguish it. There is some variability over this species' distribution in the province, and it is unclear at the time which subspecies names are best applied (N. Kondla, unpubl. data).

Scientific Name Polygonia faunus Common Name Green Comma Habitat Boreal forest clearings and roadways, occasionally occurring in the aspen parkland. Seasonality One brood per year, appearing in early spring (April to May) and again in August to October. Identification
The predominantly grey underside is most like that of P. progne, P. oreas and P. gracilis; the Green Comma has a more mottled rather than a two-toned underside, and the moss-green patches in the margins of the…
The predominantly grey underside is most like that of P. progne, P. oreas and P. gracilis; the Green Comma has a more mottled rather than a two-toned underside, and the moss-green patches in the margins of the underside will serve to distinguish it. There is some variability over this species' distribution in the province, and it is unclear at the time which subspecies names are best applied (N. Kondla, unpubl. data).
Life History
The green eggs are sculpted with 10 - 12 vertical ribs, and are laid in the spring after females overwinter and mate. The mature larvae are spiny with black, bilobed heads, the front half of the body coloured…
The green eggs are sculpted with 10 - 12 vertical ribs, and are laid in the spring after females overwinter and mate. The mature larvae are spiny with black, bilobed heads, the front half of the body coloured rust-brown and the rear pure white (Guppy & Shepard 2001). Pupae are brown or grey with silvered tubercles (Guppy & Shepard 2001). Adults hibernate in wood piles, unheated buildings and hollow trees and stumps (Guppy & Shepard 2001).
Conservation Not of concern. Diet Info
In BC, the larvae feed on willows (Salix spp.), alder (Alnus spp.) and paper birch (Betula payrifera) (Guppy & Shepard 2001). Adults rarely visit flowers, preferring instead the sap of poplars (Populus spp.) and…
In BC, the larvae feed on willows (Salix spp.), alder (Alnus spp.) and paper birch (Betula payrifera) (Guppy & Shepard 2001). Adults rarely visit flowers, preferring instead the sap of poplars (Populus spp.) and willows (Salix spp.) (Guppy & Shepard 2001), particularly in the spring when sap flows are high and contain lots of sugars. Carrion and mammal scat will also attract commas.
Range The Green Comma is found from Alaska east across the boreal region to Newfoundland and New England, in the west south to California and New Mexico (Layberry et al. 1998, Opler 1999).

Citation

Page Citation for Polygonia faunus

Page Citation

"Species Details - Polygonia faunus, University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum." University of Alberta Museums Search Site, https://search.museums.ualberta.ca/g/2-2654. Accessed 29 Jun. 2022.

Taxonomic Hierarchy

Kingdom Animalia Phylum Arthropoda Class Hexapoda Subclass Insecta Order Lepidoptera Suborder Ditrysia Superfamily Papilionoidea Family Nymphalidae Subfamily Nymphalinae Genus Polygonia Species Polygonia faunus
This hierarchy is created from our museum records, it may not always accurately reflect modern taxonomies.

Taxonomic Hierarchy for University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum