Species Details

Amphipyra pyramidoides

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum Read more about this collection »

Common NameCopper Underwing SeasonalityIn Alberta adults have been collected from the first week in August to the first week of September. IdentificationA fairly large (3.2-5.8 cm wingspan) broad-winged moth with glistening dark sooty brown forewings and copper-orange hindwings. The forewing basad to the postmedian line is darker than the terminal area. The postmedian line, the orbicular spot and to a lesser degree the antemedian line are light brown to dirty white. The antennae are simple, and the sexes are essentially alike. The large size and shining, coppery-orange unbanded hindwings will separate the Copper Underwing from all other Alberta moths.

Scientific Name Amphipyra pyramidoides Common Name Copper Underwing Habitat Dry deciduous forest. Seasonality In Alberta adults have been collected from the first week in August to the first week of September. Identification
A fairly large (3.2-5.8 cm wingspan) broad-winged moth with glistening dark sooty brown forewings and copper-orange hindwings. The forewing basad to the postmedian line is darker than the terminal area. The postmedian…
A fairly large (3.2-5.8 cm wingspan) broad-winged moth with glistening dark sooty brown forewings and copper-orange hindwings. The forewing basad to the postmedian line is darker than the terminal area. The postmedian line, the orbicular spot and to a lesser degree the antemedian line are light brown to dirty white. The antennae are simple, and the sexes are essentially alike. The large size and shining, coppery-orange unbanded hindwings will separate the Copper Underwing from all other Alberta moths.
Life History
The Copper underwing is a solitary defoliator, which feeds mainly on leaves but also is known to eat patches of skin off developing fruits. There is a single annual brood, with the adults emerging in late summer and…
The Copper underwing is a solitary defoliator, which feeds mainly on leaves but also is known to eat patches of skin off developing fruits. There is a single annual brood, with the adults emerging in late summer and early fall. The over wintering stage is the egg. The larvae are cream when they hatch, but turn green in the second instars. The adults are attracted to both lights and sugar baits.
Conservation A common widespread species; no concerns Diet Info
No Alberta data. Elsewhere in Canada a wide variety of deciduous trees, including basswood, White Elm, White Oak, White Birch, willow, Trembling Aspen, Chokecherry, Sugar Maple, Mountain-ash, Green Ash and others (see…
No Alberta data. Elsewhere in Canada a wide variety of deciduous trees, including basswood, White Elm, White Oak, White Birch, willow, Trembling Aspen, Chokecherry, Sugar Maple, Mountain-ash, Green Ash and others (see Prentice, 1962 for complete list).
Range
New Brunswick west across southern Canada to central British Columbia, south to the Florida, Texas and California. In Alberta, found only in riparian cottonwood groves along the river valleys in the grasslands region,…
New Brunswick west across southern Canada to central British Columbia, south to the Florida, Texas and California. In Alberta, found only in riparian cottonwood groves along the river valleys in the grasslands region, north to the Red Deer River at Dinosaur Provincial Park.

Citation

Page Citation for Amphipyra pyramidoides

Page Citation

"Amphipyra pyramidoides, University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum." University of Alberta Museums Search Site, https://search.museums.ualberta.ca/g/2-2325. Accessed 19 Sep. 2021.

Taxonomic Hierarchy

Kingdom Animalia Phylum Arthropoda Class Hexapoda Subclass Insecta Order Lepidoptera Suborder Ditrysia Superfamily Noctuoidea Family Noctuidae Subfamily Amphipyrinae Genus Amphipyra Species Amphipyra pyramidoides
This hierarchy is created from our museum records, it may not always accurately reflect modern taxonomies.

Taxonomic Hierarchy for University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum