Species Details

Phragmatobia assimilans

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum Read more about this collection »

Common NameLarge Ruby Tiger SeasonalityPeak flight activity is from mid May to early June, with records ranging from Apr. 14 to Jun. 9. IdentificationLargest and most common member of this genus. Forewing pattern quite variable, but the wings are always opaque, not translucent like P. lineata and P. fuliginosa. Females tend to be larger and darker, with the forewing pattern better developed.

Scientific Name Phragmatobia assimilans Common Name Large Ruby Tiger Seasonality Peak flight activity is from mid May to early June, with records ranging from Apr. 14 to Jun. 9. Identification
Largest and most common member of this genus. Forewing pattern quite variable, but the wings are always opaque, not translucent like P. lineata and P. fuliginosa. Females tend to be larger and darker, with the…
Largest and most common member of this genus. Forewing pattern quite variable, but the wings are always opaque, not translucent like P. lineata and P. fuliginosa. Females tend to be larger and darker, with the forewing pattern better developed.
Life History
There are a few specimens in the Bowman collection with dates in August. These may represent a rare second brood, reared material, or may be mislabeled. There have been no recent recordings for late summer flight…
There are a few specimens in the Bowman collection with dates in August. These may represent a rare second brood, reared material, or may be mislabeled. There have been no recent recordings for late summer flight dates in Alberta.
Diet Info
Probably various herbaceous plants; has been reared on dandelion and plantain (Gibson, 1911). Also occasionally feeds on white birch (McGugan, 1958), raspberry (Rubus), and balsam poplar (Populus balsamifera)…
Probably various herbaceous plants; has been reared on dandelion and plantain (Gibson, 1911). Also occasionally feeds on white birch (McGugan, 1958), raspberry (Rubus), and balsam poplar (Populus balsamifera) (Northern Forestry Centre, Edmonton, AB).
Range A boreal forest and transition zone (parkland) species, found from Nova Scotia south to New England, west to British Columbia. Not known further south than Montana and the Black Hills of South Dakota (Donahue, 1993).

Citation

Page Citation for Phragmatobia assimilans

Page Citation

"Phragmatobia assimilans, University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum." University of Alberta Museums Search Site, https://search.museums.ualberta.ca/g/2-232. Accessed 25 Jul. 2021.

Taxonomic Hierarchy

Kingdom Animalia Phylum Arthropoda Class Hexapoda Subclass Insecta Order Lepidoptera Suborder Ditrysia Superfamily Noctuoidea Family Arctiidae Genus Phragmatobia Species Phragmatobia assimilans
This hierarchy is created from our museum records, it may not always accurately reflect modern taxonomies.

Taxonomic Hierarchy for University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum