Species Details

Setagrotis radiola

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum Read more about this collection »

SeasonalityIn Alberta, adults have been collected during the later half of August. IdentificationA medium-size moth (3.5 cm wingspan) with grey-brown forewings and shining white hindwings. The pattern on the forewings is longitudinal. Background is yellow-brown or grey brown. There is a prominent black basal streak, and much of the cell is also black-filled. Veins are marked with a thin line of black scales, bordered on both sides by pale scales. The normal cross lines are reduced to a series of black spots or small blotches marking the upper half of the postmedian line, and a series of small black crescents or triangles between the veins at the terminal line. The fringe is dark brown with a few cream-colored scales mixed in. Hindwings are shining white, with a few dark scales marking the veins, particularly on the outer third, and with a series of small black dashes between the veins marking the terminal line. A faint median band is also indicated, particularly in females, by a few dark scales adjacent to the veins. The inner half of the fringe is cream and pale grey, the outer half white. The antennae are simple. Sexes are essentially alike.

Scientific Name Setagrotis radiola Habitat Arid grasslands and badlands. Seasonality In Alberta, adults have been collected during the later half of August. Identification
A medium-size moth (3.5 cm wingspan) with grey-brown forewings and shining white hindwings. The pattern on the forewings is longitudinal. Background is yellow-brown or grey brown. There is a prominent black basal…
A medium-size moth (3.5 cm wingspan) with grey-brown forewings and shining white hindwings. The pattern on the forewings is longitudinal. Background is yellow-brown or grey brown. There is a prominent black basal streak, and much of the cell is also black-filled. Veins are marked with a thin line of black scales, bordered on both sides by pale scales. The normal cross lines are reduced to a series of black spots or small blotches marking the upper half of the postmedian line, and a series of small black crescents or triangles between the veins at the terminal line. The fringe is dark brown with a few cream-colored scales mixed in. Hindwings are shining white, with a few dark scales marking the veins, particularly on the outer third, and with a series of small black dashes between the veins marking the terminal line. A faint median band is also indicated, particularly in females, by a few dark scales adjacent to the veins. The inner half of the fringe is cream and pale grey, the outer half white. The antennae are simple. Sexes are essentially alike.
Life History Adults are nocturnal and come to light. There is a single brood each season, which flies in late summer to early fall. The larvae are unknown. Conservation The colony at Dinosaur Provincial Park is the only known Canadian population. Diet Info Unknown. Range
Primarily a Great Basin species. Radiola occurs from north central Washington, south to western California, southern Nevada, northern Arizona and New Mexico, east to central Colorado, western Nebraska and western…
Primarily a Great Basin species. Radiola occurs from north central Washington, south to western California, southern Nevada, northern Arizona and New Mexico, east to central Colorado, western Nebraska and western North Dakota. In Alberta (and Canada), found only in the Red Deer River badlands at Dinosaur Provincial Park.

Citation

Page Citation for Setagrotis radiola

Page Citation

"Setagrotis radiola, University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum." University of Alberta Museums Search Site, https://search.museums.ualberta.ca/g/2-2149. Accessed 29 Nov. 2021.

Taxonomic Hierarchy

Kingdom Animalia Phylum Arthropoda Class Hexapoda Subclass Insecta Order Lepidoptera Suborder Ditrysia Superfamily Noctuoidea Family Noctuidae Subfamily Noctuinae Genus Setagrotis Species Setagrotis radiola
This hierarchy is created from our museum records, it may not always accurately reflect modern taxonomies.

Taxonomic Hierarchy for University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum