Species Details

Eilema bicolor

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum Read more about this collection »

Common NameYellow-edged Footman SeasonalityJuly - August. IdentificationBecause of its relatively small size, this species could possibly be mistaken for a micro-moth. However, the comparatively large hindwing and a yellow forewing costa distinguishs this species.

Scientific Name Eilema bicolor Common Name Yellow-edged Footman Habitat Found in the boreal forest. Sporadic in the parkland and riparian cottonwoods in the prairies. Seasonality July - August. Identification Because of its relatively small size, this species could possibly be mistaken for a micro-moth. However, the comparatively large hindwing and a yellow forewing costa distinguishs this species. Life History No information available. Conservation Common. Diet Info
Lichens growing on conifers, although development can occur on the conifer needles themselves (McGugan, 1958). Since this species also occurs in non-coniferous habitats, larvae must also feed on other lichens,…
Lichens growing on conifers, although development can occur on the conifer needles themselves (McGugan, 1958). Since this species also occurs in non-coniferous habitats, larvae must also feed on other lichens, possibly those associated with mature aspen and poplar trees.
Range Newfoundland west to Yukon and Alaska, south through B.C. and Alberta.

Citation

Page Citation for Eilema bicolor

Page Citation

"Eilema bicolor, University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum." University of Alberta Museums Search Site, https://search.museums.ualberta.ca/g/2-1943. Accessed 19 Sep. 2021.

Taxonomic Hierarchy

Kingdom Animalia Phylum Arthropoda Class Hexapoda Subclass Insecta Order Lepidoptera Suborder Ditrysia Superfamily Noctuoidea Family Arctiidae Genus Eilema Species Eilema bicolor
This hierarchy is created from our museum records, it may not always accurately reflect modern taxonomies.

Taxonomic Hierarchy for University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum