Species Details

Clostera albosigma

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum Read more about this collection »

Common NameSigmoid Prominent SeasonalityDeciduous woodland and shrublands. IdentificationA medium-size (2.8-3.8 cm wingspan) grey-brown or brown moth with short bipectinate antennae and a characteristic tuft on the tip of the abdomen in males. The forewing is crossed by four fine pale lines, much more prominent in spring than in summer specimens. The apical quarter of the wing is dark chocolate or red-brown, sharply delineated from the remainder of the wing and separated at the costa by a short curved white bar. It can be separated from other Clostera species by the sharp demarcation of the dark apical patch on the forewing. It most closely resembles the smaller and darker Clostera brucei, which lacks the sharp contrasting separation of the dark apical area from the rest of the forewing. Spring specimens which are paler and marrked be a series of pale lines have been named form specifica; summer specimens are darker and more uniform in color and pattern. Sexes are similar, but female antennae are simple. See also Clostera apicalis.

Scientific Name Clostera albosigma Common Name Sigmoid Prominent Habitat In Alberta adults are on the wing from the first week in May through mid-August. Seasonality Deciduous woodland and shrublands. Identification
A medium-size (2.8-3.8 cm wingspan) grey-brown or brown moth with short bipectinate antennae and a characteristic tuft on the tip of the abdomen in males. The forewing is crossed by four fine pale lines, much more…
A medium-size (2.8-3.8 cm wingspan) grey-brown or brown moth with short bipectinate antennae and a characteristic tuft on the tip of the abdomen in males. The forewing is crossed by four fine pale lines, much more prominent in spring than in summer specimens. The apical quarter of the wing is dark chocolate or red-brown, sharply delineated from the remainder of the wing and separated at the costa by a short curved white bar. It can be separated from other Clostera species by the sharp demarcation of the dark apical patch on the forewing. It most closely resembles the smaller and darker Clostera brucei, which lacks the sharp contrasting separation of the dark apical area from the rest of the forewing. Spring specimens which are paler and marrked be a series of pale lines have been named form specifica; summer specimens are darker and more uniform in color and pattern. Sexes are similar, but female antennae are simple. See also Clostera apicalis.
Life History Adults are nocturnal and come to light, but are not attracted to sugar baits. The larvae are solitary leaf folders. The extended flight period suggests more than a single brood, but this needs to be documented. Conservation A common, widespread species; no concerns. Diet Info Canadian data, which includes Alberta data, lists various poplars (Populus) and willows (Salix), with Aspen poplar (P. tremuloides) by far the most prevalent host. Range
Newfoundland west to Vancouver Island, north to Great Slave Lake, Northwest Territories and south to at least Missouri. In Alberta they occur throughout most of the wooded parts of the province north to Zama. Uncommon…
Newfoundland west to Vancouver Island, north to Great Slave Lake, Northwest Territories and south to at least Missouri. In Alberta they occur throughout most of the wooded parts of the province north to Zama. Uncommon in the wooded valleys of the grasslands region.
Clostera albosigma
Clostera albosigma
Clostera albosigma

Citation

Page Citation for Clostera albosigma

Page Citation

"Clostera albosigma, University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum." University of Alberta Museums Search Site, https://search.museums.ualberta.ca/g/2-1479. Accessed 27 Oct. 2021.

Taxonomic Hierarchy

Kingdom Animalia Phylum Arthropoda Class Hexapoda Subclass Insecta Order Lepidoptera Suborder Ditrysia Superfamily Noctuoidea Family Notodontidae Genus Clostera Species Clostera albosigma
This hierarchy is created from our museum records, it may not always accurately reflect modern taxonomies.

Taxonomic Hierarchy for University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum