Species Details

Plusia putnami

University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum Read more about this collection »

Common NamePutnam's Looper Moth SeasonalityAdults have been captured in Alberta from late May through August and once in early October. IdentificationA medium-size moth ( 3.0-3.2 cm wingspan). The forewings are dark rusty-brown, with a series of fine faint dark oblique lines, and with bright metallic rusty orange on the basal portion of the costa and along the lower median area. There is an oblique dull silver patch on the apex and a prominent two-part silver stigma, comprised of a large triangular spot followed by a smaller, separate satellite spot. Hindwings are dark brown with rust fringes. The antennae are simple, and both the sexes are similar. The similar P. contexta has been reported from Saskatchewan and should be watched for in eastern Alberta. It has paler hindwings, and the stigma is a single elongated spot constricted somewhat in the center.

Scientific Name Plusia putnami Common Name Putnam's Looper Moth Seasonality Adults have been captured in Alberta from late May through August and once in early October. Identification
A medium-size moth ( 3.0-3.2 cm wingspan). The forewings are dark rusty-brown, with a series of fine faint dark oblique lines, and with bright metallic rusty orange on the basal portion of the costa and along the…
A medium-size moth ( 3.0-3.2 cm wingspan). The forewings are dark rusty-brown, with a series of fine faint dark oblique lines, and with bright metallic rusty orange on the basal portion of the costa and along the lower median area. There is an oblique dull silver patch on the apex and a prominent two-part silver stigma, comprised of a large triangular spot followed by a smaller, separate satellite spot. Hindwings are dark brown with rust fringes. The antennae are simple, and both the sexes are similar. The similar P. contexta has been reported from Saskatchewan and should be watched for in eastern Alberta. It has paler hindwings, and the stigma is a single elongated spot constricted somewhat in the center.
Life History Putnam's Looper Moth is nocturnal and comes to light. The flight period is quite extended, and there may be at least a partial second brood. Conservation A fairly common, widespread species; no concerns. Diet Info The larvae feed on a variety of grasses and sedges, as well as on bur-reed (Sparganium). Range
In the Palearctic, it occurs from eastern Siberia to Fennoscandia, Great Britain and France. In North America, it ranges from Newfoundland and Labrador to central Alaska and the interior of British Columbia, south to…
In the Palearctic, it occurs from eastern Siberia to Fennoscandia, Great Britain and France. In North America, it ranges from Newfoundland and Labrador to central Alaska and the interior of British Columbia, south to Pennsylvania, Washington, northeastern California, and in the Rocky Mountains to Utah and Colorado. It is found throughout the wooded parts of Alberta, from the southern Foothills to Lake Athabasca, but appears to be absent from the wooded valleys of the Grasslands region.

Citation

Page Citation for Plusia putnami

Page Citation

"Plusia putnami, University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum." University of Alberta Museums Search Site, https://search.museums.ualberta.ca/g/2-1133. Accessed 20 Jun. 2021.

Taxonomic Hierarchy

Kingdom Animalia Phylum Arthropoda Class Hexapoda Subclass Insecta Order Lepidoptera Suborder Ditrysia Superfamily Noctuoidea Family Noctuidae Subfamily Plusiinae Genus Plusia Species Plusia putnami
This hierarchy is created from our museum records, it may not always accurately reflect modern taxonomies.

Taxonomic Hierarchy for University of Alberta E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum